Learning outcomes

Learning outcomes

  • Assess the influence that intellectual property (IP) ownership has on the way that you share data, transfer knowledge and publish research
  • Provide examples of how researchers from a variety of disciplines share knowledge, transfer data and publish research with regard to IP ownership
  • Outline the action you will take to share data, transfer knowledge and publish research with regard to your IP ownership.

Using the module

Welcome to Intellectual Property in the Research Context. An understanding of intellectual property (IP) is essential for researchers in any disciplinary field. This course will provide a clear explanation of this potentially intimidating subject area and will guide you through many of its practical applications, from publishing papers to commercialising research. Open access publishing and emerging technologies add complexity to the area of IP and are untangled here with contemporary case studies and scenarios. Intellectual Property in the Research Context is part of the Becoming a Researcher programme.

This module introduces you to principles and rules governing IP when you share data, transfer knowledge and publish research. It guides you through some of the problems and dilemmas you might face, provides solutions and advises on specific action that you can take to ensure your IP is protected.

If this is the first time you have accessed the Intellectual Property in the Research Context course, or if you need a brief reminder, here is some information on how the screens are organised, and some of the tools and features that are used throughout:


Content

  • The centre of each screen contains the core content for the course, presented as either text, interactive activities, graphics, videos or animations
  • Text highlighted in a box preceded by an arrow contains instructions on how to navigate the activities that follow

  • Terms highlighted like this are clickable glossary terms, and can be clicked on to access pop-up boxes containing definitions of key terms
  • Note that your responses to the notemaking and text entry activities (where you type responses in the space provided) can be printed and used as part of your ongoing work
  • At the top of each screen you will see an indication of the approximate time it will take to complete the core content. These estimates include time to watch videos and complete activities in the central section, but not to read the content in pods.

Poll questions

The poll questions are designed to help you think about your own situation and attitudes, and to compare your responses to those of others taking the course. Consider talking to an academic advisor about your responses.


Pods

Throughout this course, you will find additional learning opportunities in 'pods'. Exploring the information provided in the pods will enrich the learning experience.

  • Useful information pod iconUseful information Contains extra content, downloadable templates and links to useful resources to expand on key points from the main screen.
  • Your context pod iconYour context Contains links and information specific to your context and/or institution.
  • In practice pod iconIP in practice Contains short case studies.
  • Part-time research pod iconAcademic application Highlights real-world implications in an academic context and includes practical tips.
  • Employability skills pod iconEmployability skills Highlights transferable skills that are valuable both within and outside of an academic setting.
  • Download pod iconDownload Contains the glossary for the entire course.

Quiz

At the very end of each module, you have the opportunity to test your learning further with a multiple-choice quiz. This consists of five questions and can be taken more than once (a new set of questions will appear).


The Intellectual Property in the Research Context course is designed to gradually build up your understanding and skills. We recommend that you complete the modules in the order given, but they have been designed so you can access each of them independently according to your own requirements and those of your institution.

Expert panel

Author

Dr. Catherine Dawson

Dr. Catherine Dawson

Catherine Dawson is a researcher and writer specialising in research methods, digital research methods and teaching research methods. She has worked as a researcher and tutor for a number of UK universities and colleges, including the University of Sheffield, Sheffield Hallam University and Northern College, an adult residential college located near Barnsley. Over the years she has developed and delivered a number of research methods courses for postgraduate students, and has delivered bespoke training courses in the public and private sectors. She has also published a variety of research methods books aimed at undergraduates, postgraduates and tutors.


Lead advisors

Professor Fiona Denney

Professor Fiona Denney

Fiona Denney is a Professor of Business Education at Brunel Business School, Brunel University London, where she has a particular focus on supporting and enhancing the student experience. From 2014 to 2020 she was the Director of the Brunel Educational Excellence Centre, supporting learning and teaching enhancement for both staff and students. Fiona is a member of the Executive Committee of the UK Council for Graduate Education, a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy and a Fellow of the Royal Society for the encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce (RSA). She has a Ph.D. in marketing and has held academic posts in marketing and management studies. Fiona has worked in academic staff development since 2003 and has research interests in academic leadership.

Professor Douglas Halliday

Professor Douglas Halliday

Douglas Halliday is a Co-Director of Durham Energy Institute and the Director of the Multidisciplinary Centre for Doctoral Training in Energy, which trains doctoral candidates across science and social sciences in a multidisciplinary training environment, helping doctoral candidates to understand the breadth and complexity of the whole energy system. Douglas is the Director of Durham University Global Challenges Centre for Doctoral Training, supporting a cohort of international students to undertake research exploring solutions for the UN Sustainable Development Goals. Previously, he was Dean of Durham's Graduate School from 2005 to 2010 and a recipient of a 2009 THE Award for Outstanding Support for Early Career Researchers. He is a Fellow of the Institute of Physics and the Energy Institute, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy. Douglas was Chair of the UK Council for Graduate Education until July 2021.


Reviewers

Dr. Hayleigh Bosher

Dr. Hayleigh Bosher

Hayleigh Bosher is a Senior Lecturer in Intellectual Property Law and Associate Dean (Professional Development and Graduate Outcomes) at Brunel University London, as well as Visiting Research Fellow at the Centre for Intellectual Property, Policy and Management (CIPPM), writer and book review editor for specialist blog The IPKat, founder of the World IP Women (WIPW) network, and an intellectual property and entertainment law consultant. Hayleigh's main research areas include copyright enforcement and infringement in the entertainment industries, particularly in music, in social media, online and more recently in artificial intelligence. Her most recent book, Copyright in the Music Industry (Edward Elgar Publishing, 2021), is accompanied by a playlist and podcast.

Dr. Ben McCann

Dr. Ben McCann

Ben McCann is Associate Professor of French Studies at the University of Adelaide. He is the co-editor of Michael Haneke: Europe Utopia (Columbia University Press, 2011) and Framing French Culture (Adelaide University Press, 2015) and the author of Ripping Open the Set: French Film Design, 1930–1939 (Peter Lang, 2013), Le Jour se lève (I.B. Tauris, 2013), Julien Duvivier (Manchester University Press, 2017) and L'Auberge espagnole: European Youth on Film (Routledge, 2018). From 2017 to 2021, he was the Faculty of Arts Postgraduate Coordinator for French, German, Classics, Education and Philosophy.

Professor Mary McNamara

Professor Mary McNamara

Mary McNamara (CChem, FRSC) is Head of the Graduate Research School, Technological University Dublin, Ireland. She graduated with an honours degree from the Royal Society of Chemistry and obtained a Ph.D. in Physical Inorganic Chemistry from University College Dublin. Mary was a member (2012–2018) of the steering committee of the Council for Doctoral Education of the European University Association and, in Ireland, she is a member of the National Forum on Research Integrity. Mary is also a member of the National Advisory Forum for Ireland's National Framework for Doctoral Education. She is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry and an active researcher in the development of novel drug delivery systems.

Dr. Aislinn O'Connell

Dr. Aislinn O'Connell

Aislinn O'Connell is a Lecturer in Law at Royal Holloway, University of London, where she teaches intellectual property law, contract law and tort law. Her research focuses on the intersection between intellectual property laws and new media, encompassing digital technologies, street art, and online image and video sharing.

Professor Leigh Wilson

Professor Leigh Wilson

Leigh Wilson is Director of the Graduate School and Professor of English Literature at the University of Westminster. Her research is in three broad areas: modernism; the novel in the 20th and 21st centuries; and the role of publishing in the construction of literary culture. She co-runs the Contemporary Small Press project at Westminster. As Director of the Graduate School, she has run a research project on the links between wellbeing and writing for doctoral students.


Accessibility advisor

Wilma Alexander

Wilma Alexander

Wilma Alexander is a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy with Master's degrees in Human–Computer Interaction, Linguistics and Information Science. She has over 15 years of experience as a manager with the online learning team at the University of Edinburgh, where she specialised in usable and accessible digital practice, tutored on the groundbreaking Master's degree in Digital Education and developed online staff training on accessible e-learning and online tutoring skills. Since retiring from the university at the end of 2015, Wilma has provided consultancy services on all aspects of online learning, with a special focus on accessibility and usability issues.