TRANSFORMING HIGHER EDUCATION THROUGH EXCEPTIONAL ONLINE LEARNING

Authors

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Sandro Leidi:
Lead advisor and course author

A senior statistician at the Statistical Services Centre, University of Reading, Sandro has been working in Statistics since 1997, training professionals and providing training to institutions. Along with his colleagues, he has been delivering statistical e-learning since 2004. His consultancy group has many renowned clients, including the National Audit Office, UK, and the United Nations Framework Convention for Climate Change.

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Wilma Alexander:
Accessibility advisor

Wilma Alexander is part of the Learning Services team at the University of Edinburgh, supporting the use of online tools and technologies across the university. She has a special interest in usable and accessible digital practice, tutors on usability and accessibility for the university's Master's in Digital Education, and promotes the use of online activities for inclusive teaching and learning in the context of staff development.

Learning outcomes

After completing this course you will be able to:

  • Explain to your colleagues what a statistical model is
  • Recall some of the advantages of using a statistical model
  • Explain the link between a one-sample t-test and the simplest summary model (i.e. the 'null model', which is the starting point of all summary models)
  • Understand that straight line regression is the next step from a null model when the single explanatory variable is measured on a continuous numerical scale.

Course structure

The diagram on the right explains the chronology of the course. Click on each of the sections to view a more detailed breakdown of this course.

Orientation

Introduction to the course, helping you gain a feel for how it will develop.

Course files

The course content. The target knowledge and concepts are introduced during this stage.

Course quiz

A chance to test your knowledge and recall
what you have learned from the course so far.

Highlights

Course highlights include:

  • A worked example that shows you how to conduct a t-test in a statistics software package
  • A flowchart which highlights the stages of the statistical modelling framework
  • A 'book' activity which takes you through a step-by-step example of using statistical modelling
  • 'Interactive model' pods which help you to see the theory in action, covering topics such as 'Small residuals' and 'Regression coefficients'.

Supporting institutions

The Statistical Methods for Research programme has been developed in conjunction with the following institutions:

  • Brunel University, UK
  • Dublin Institute of Technology, Ireland
  • Edith Cowan University, Australia
  • James Cook University, Australia
  • London Metropolitan University, UK
  • Sheffield Hallam University, UK
  • University College Cork, Ireland
  • University of Birmingham, UK
  • University of Brighton, UK
  • University of Huddersfield, UK
  • University of Reading, UK

Authors

Sandro Leidi: Lead advisor and course author

A senior statistician at the Statistical Services Centre, University of Reading, Sandro has been working in Statistics since 1997, training professionals and providing training to institutions. Along with his colleagues, he has been delivering statistical e-learning since 2004. His consultancy group has many renowned clients, including the National Audit Office, UK, and the United Nations Framework Convention for Climate Change.


Wilma Alexander: Accessibility advisor

Wilma Alexander is part of the Learning Services team at the University of Edinburgh, supporting the use of online tools and technologies across the university. She has a special interest in usable and accessible digital practice, tutors on usability and accessibility for the university's Master's in Digital Education, and promotes the use of online activities for inclusive teaching and learning in the context of staff development.


Learning outcomes

After completing this course you will be able to:

  • Explain to your colleagues what a statistical model is
  • Recall some of the advantages of using a statistical model
  • Explain the link between a one-sample t-test and the simplest summary model (i.e. the 'null model', which is the starting point of all summary models)
  • Understand that straight line regression is the next step from a null model when the single explanatory variable is measured on a continuous numerical scale.

Course structure

The bullet points below explain the chronology of the course and give a breakdown of each of the sections you will encounter.

Orientation

The Orientation section introduces you to the content and aims of the course. There is an opportunity to assess your current knowledge, to help you evaluate your learning at the end of the course.

  • Introduction

Course files

The course files contain the core course content. The content is divided into units and screens.

  • Unit 1: Statistical modelling

Course quiz

The Course quiz section allows you to assess and consolidate what you have learned in the course.

  • Course quiz

Highlights

Course highlights include:

  • A worked example that shows you how to conduct a t-test in a statistics software package
  • A flowchart which highlights the stages of the statistical modelling framework
  • A 'book' activity which takes you through a step-by-step example of using statistical modelling
  • 'Interactive model' pods which help you to see the theory in action, covering topics such as 'Small residuals' and 'Regression coefficients'.

Supporting institutions

The Statistical Methods for Research programme has been developed
in conjunction with the following institutions:

  • Brunel University, UK
  • Dublin Institute of Technology, Ireland
  • Edith Cowan University, Australia
  • James Cook University, Australia
  • London Metropolitan University, UK
  • Sheffield Hallam University, UK
  • University College Cork, Ireland
  • University of Birmingham, UK
  • University of Brighton, UK
  • University of Huddersfield, UK
  • University of Reading, UK